Archive for November, 2008

With the door to my room securely locked and the volume of my television lowered far enough that just a slight strain allowed me to hear the program, I secretly watched “So You Think You Can Dance”. As one guy began his audition, performing to a poem, rather than music, I listened.  The short, but nonetheless, powerful verse that framed his art form mostly presented injustices suffered by African Americans. Of these injustices the majority were imposed upon us by others, but a couple were self imposed. The poet, Iesha Jaco, speaks of Hurricane Katrina, lynchings, gentrification, and drug dealing, saying how they thought it was cool… After mentioning drug dealing she turns the tables and puts the ball in our, the African American community’s, court saying, “the problem is, we think it’s cool too. Check your ingredients before you overdose on the cool.” I think she is challenging us to stop imposing injustice on ourselves. We have no control over what others have done and may do, but we can control what we do. This poem was the introduction to Lupe Fiasco’s 2007 release, The Cool.  Lupe is definitely a progressive rapper and on my list of favorites, and it’s ironic that he was inspired to become a hip hop artist when he heard It Was Written, the sophomore project from my favorite artist, Nas. Check out the poem posted below and give me your take on the message…

PEACE…

 

theobamafamily

Yesterday I cried. As I drove to work, listening to the music being played on the radio that ever so accurately described what this day meant for me and millions of other Americans, my eyes welled up with tears at the possible outcome of today’s election.  The long lines I encountered at 6 am, brought an oxymoronic smile to my face. No age group went unrepresented. Young and old were there to make their voice heard.

The second round of the liquid emotion came when Jeff Johnson of BET’s The Truth announced that Barack Obama had just been elected to be the next President of the United States. The tears continued when our 44th President walked out onto the stage in Chicago, with his family, America’s family, The First Family, showing the world the new image of the Black family. Love, unity, support, strength, integrity and accomplishment left that stage affecting all who watched. As I sat in my Grandmother’s living room, all in attendance expressing their deep appreciation of this event with tear soaked faces, everyone listened to his powerful voice, eloquent speak, and hard hitting message. President Obama spoke to me when he mouthed, “It’s been a long time coming, but a change is going to come…” speaking a line from my favorite old school song, Sam Cooke’s A Change is Gonna Come.  I previously posted a video, The Great Black Vote that combined this song with some powerful images of the black experience in America. Once again my Grandmother verbalized a truly powerful statement, “I can’t believe I lived to see this.” This same comment, when spoken during the DNC, inspired a post by me, Barack and Being Black. She along with a countless amount of African Americans never thought his day would come. For my grandmother who has lived in the Jim Crow south, with an illiterate mother and brothers serving a less than deserving country, The Dream has been realized. I looked down at my niece who has only been on this earth for four years, lying in the arms of my sister, naive to this historic event that is taking place. I am happy at the progress that America has made and what this day tells me about the world she will live in. Now it’s time for us to step our game up. It’s time for us to support our newly elected President. It’s time for us to show this country, this world, that African Americans can accomplish anything. Yesterday I cried, but I didn’t cry alone. Obama believed throughout his campaign, and we supported him, YES WE CAN. History has been made, YES WE DID. Now the furture is up to us, YES WE WILL.

PEACE…